Cofradia, Mexico


THE CARRILLO VALERIA FAMILY

Fernando Carrillo first met Ana Valeria five years ago, when she was attending high school with his sister and would come to his house to visit her. However, after she graduated, Ana moved to the capital city of Tepic to work. Once she got there, she invited Fernando’s sister to come work with her. A few months after his sister started working with Ana, Fernando and his family went to Tepic; his mother was battling cancer, and she was receiving treatments in the hospital there. The two started spending time together and soon were dating. Six months later, they moved in with each other in Fernando’s dad’s house in Cofradía, where they have lived for the past two and a half years. This sweet couple now has a young son named Kevin and a baby girl named Odalis. Fernando works in the fields, and Ana takes care of the children. Fernando’s dad gave them some land behind his house to build a home of their own. For this young, active couple, having a home of their own would mean having a place where they can live in peace and focus on raising their children.


THE LOPEZ CARILLO FAMILY

Zeferino Carillo-Matías and Jesús Lopez-Vázquez have four children and currently work as field hands only for two or three months every year in order to support their children. When they travel to find work, the children have to stay with Jesús’s mother. This is because the children are young, and the home where they currently live is unsafe.  They don’t want to risk anything happening to the children. In addition, Zeferino works in Tepic (about an hour and a half from Cofradia) when he can, helping with construction.  This kind of work does not provide sufficent income to make improvements on their home.  During the rainy season, they have to find somewhere else to stay because their roof leaks so badly. They are seeking God’s provision of much more work in order to provide a better living situation for their family. In other words, they are waiting on a miracle.


THE MARTINEZ PARTIDA FAMILY

Diego Martinez and Sandy Partida live in a borrowed house in Las Pilas.  This young couple has been together for 11 years.  They met while working in the fields planting melons.  Sandy was interested in Diego and wanted him to ask her out.  She remembers watching other young ladies flirt with Diego, so she decided not to wait and asked him out, instead.  The couple dated for four months before moving in together.  Now, Diego cares for cows and repairs fences, and Sandy makes and sells cheese during the rainy season.  They really want to have children and are seeing a doctor who is helping them with their fertility struggles. The couple has lived in the borrowed house for five years, and they are ready to feel the security that comes with knowing they are in a home of their own.  This home would also be a place where they would start their family and raise their children.


THE OROZCO RODRIGUEZ FAMILY

Guillermo (Guille) Orozco Franco and Valeria Danitza Rodriguez Rojas have a young daughter named Kathy Makeila Orozco Rodriguez. The couple shares a deep sense of responsibility before God to care for their family.  They currently live in the house that belonged to Guille’s great-grandmother. Guille’s grandfather gave them some land as a gift, but Guille wants to save up the money to pay him for it.  Guille does everything he can to earn money: he helps with construction projects, repairs electrical items, works in the fields, and teaches classes to the indigenous adults and youth who haven’t completed elementary and/or middle school. Sometimes, he works in the state capital, Tepic—about an hour and a half from Cofradia—helping with construction projects and selling fish and shrimp. Valeria stays home and takes care of Kathy. The family’s income still is not enough to pay for a house. Valeria and Guille agree that if they were selected to receive a house, it would truly be a blessing from God.


THE VÁZQUEZ MARTINEZ FAMILY

José Vázquez and Silvia Martinez are raising their young son, José Alexis in the nearby town of Santa Fe.  The couple met in Chihuahua where José was working in orchards picking apples and peaches.  Two years later, Silvia came to work in the same fields, and José fell for her right away.  After dating for five months, the couple moved to Santa Fe where José now works in the nearby fields, and Silvia cares for José Alexis. The family lives in a home they are borrowing from José’s parents.  The house floods during the rainy season.  For this family, having a house would mean having the security of being in a home of their own on their land.  It would also be a safe place for them to live that wouldn’t flood every year.


THE SERRANO PANUCO FAMILY

Luis Serrano and Katia Panuco live in Cofradía where they are raising their beautiful daughter, Rosario. Luis first saw Katia in San Juan while he was selling water in the towns.  He asked her out, and they dated for two years before moving in together in Luis's parents' house.  Luis hurt his finger, a while back, working on a boat in Mazatlán.  He has a lot of pain in his finger which makes it difficult for him to work.  He currently drives a dump truck and assists auto mechanics for supplemental income.  Katia stays home and cares for Rosario. Luis and Katia have been given land by Luis's father, and they know having a home of their own would be a great blessing.


THE VALDEZ FAMILY

Mercedes Valadez is a single mother raising her teenage daughter, Mar. They are from the nearby town of Tuxpan, and now live in the ranching community of Los Arrayanes. Mercedes and Mar live in a borrowed house and soon need to move because the owners need the house again.  She currently has nowhere to live, but owns an empty piece of property on which to build.  Mercedes’ income comes from doing odd jobs, and selling meals to the field workers, and harvesting the garbanzo beans she planted.  Her dream is to have a home full of love and happiness where she can raise Mar and where Jesus would be the center of their lives.


THE VÁZQUEZ FAMILY

María Vázquez is a hard working single mother raising her young son, Eric in the nearby town of Santa Fe.  When she was younger, María worked in Ruiz where she met Eric’s dad.  He moved to the United States, and later María and Eric moved there to be with him.  It didn’t work out for them, so María and Eric moved back to Mexico and stayed with her sister.  However, when her sister’s husband returned home, they had to move out.  She rented a house for a while, but it was very difficult for her to make the payments with money she earned selling meals.  When her brother and his family moved to Cofradía, they loaned María their house in Santa Fe.  Everyday, she worries that her brother will need his house again, and she and Eric will be asked to move.  For her, having a home would mean happiness, peace and the security of having a place of her own where she knows she would never be asked to leave.